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Jul 5 2017 refs filesystems

ReFS Part III - Back to the Resilience

We've made some great headway on the ReFS filesystem anaylsis front to the point of being able to implement a rudimentary file extraction mechanism (complete with timestamps).

First a recap of the story so far:

Before going into details, we should note this analysis is based on observations against ReFS disks generated locally, without extensive sequential cross-referencing and comparison of many large files with many changes. Also it is possible that some structures are oversimplified and/or not fully understood. That being said, this should provide a solid basis for additional analysis, getting us deep into the filesystem, and allowing us to poke and prod with isolated bits to identify their semantics.

Now onto the fun stuff!


- A ReFS filesystem can be identified with the following signature at the very start of the partition:

    00 00 00 52  65 46 53 00  00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00 ...ReFS.........
    46 53 52 53  XX XX XX XX  XX XX XX XX  XX XX XX XX FSRS

- The following Ruby code will tell you if a given offset in a given file contains a ReFS partition:

    # Point this to the file containing the disk image
    DISK="~/ReFS-disk.img"

    # Point this at the start of the partition containing the ReFS filesystem
    ADDRESS=0x500000

    # FileSystem Signature we are looking for
    FS_SIGNATURE  = [0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x52, 0x65, 0x46, 0x53, 0x00] # ...ReFS.

    img = File.open(File.expand_path(DISK), 'rb')
    img.seek ADDRESS
    sig = img.read(FS_SIGNATURE.size).unpack('C*')
    puts "Disk #{sig == FS_SIGNATURE ? "contains" : "does not contain"} ReFS filesystem"

- ReFS pages are 0x4000 bytes in length

- On all inspected systems, the first page number is 0x1e (0x78000 bytes after the start of the partition containing the filesystem). This is inline w/ Microsoft documentation which states that the first metadata dir is at a fixed offset on the disk.

- Other pages contain various system, directory, and volume structures and tables as well as journaled versions of each page (shadow-written upon regular disk writes)


- The first byte of each page is its Page Number

- The first 0x30 bytes of every metadata page (dubbed the Page Header) seem to follow a certain pattern:

    byte  0: XX XX 00 00   00 00 00 00   YY 00 00 00   00 00 00 00
    byte 16: 00 00 00 00   00 00 00 00   ZZ ZZ 00 00   00 00 00 00
    byte 32: 01 00 00 00   00 00 00 00   00 00 00 00   00 00 00 00

- Multiple pages may share a virtual page number (byte 24/dword 6) but usually don't appear in sequence.

- The following Ruby code will print out the pages in a ReFS partition along w/ their shadow copies:

    # Point this to the file containing the disk image
    DISK="~/ReFS-disk.img"
    
    # Point this at the start of the partition containing the ReFS filesystem
    ADDRESS=0x500000
    
    PAGE_SIZE=0x4000
    PAGE_SEQ=0x08
    PAGE_VIRTUAL_PAGE_NUM=0x18
    
    FIRST_PAGE = 0x1e
    
    img = File.open(File.expand_path(DISK), 'rb')
    
    page_id = FIRST_PAGE
    img.seek(ADDRESS + page_id*PAGE_SIZE)
    while contents = img.read(PAGE_SIZE)
      id = contents.unpack('S').first
      if id == page_id
        pos = img.pos
    
        start = ADDRESS + page_id * PAGE_SIZE
    
        img.seek(start + PAGE_SEQ)
        seq = img.read(4).unpack("L").first
    
        img.seek(start + PAGE_VIRTUAL_PAGE_NUM)
        vpn = img.read(4).unpack("L").first
    
        print "page: "
        print "0x#{id.to_s(16).upcase}".ljust(7)
        print " @ "
        print "0x#{start.to_s(16).upcase}".ljust(10)
        print ": Seq - "
        print "0x#{seq.to_s(16).upcase}".ljust(7)
        print "/ VPN - "
        print "0x#{vpn.to_s(16).upcase}".ljust(9)
        puts
    
        img.seek pos
      end
      page_id += 1
    end

- The object table (virtual page number 0x02) associates object ids' with the pages on which they reside. Here we an AttributeList consisting of Records of key/value pairs (see below for the specifics on these data structures). We can lookup the object id of the root directory (0x600000000) to retrieve the page on which it resides:

   50 00 00 00 10 00 10 00 00 00 20 00 30 00 00 00 - total length / key & value boundries
   00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 06 00 00 00 00 00 00 - object id
   F4 0A 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 02 08 08 00 00 00 - page id / flags
   CE 0F 85 14 83 01 DC 39 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 - checksum
   08 00 00 00 08 00 00 00 04 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

^ The object table entry for the root dir, containing its page (0xAF4)

- When retrieving pages by id of virtual page number, look for the ones with the highest sequence number as those are the latest copies of the shadow-write mechanism.

- Expanding upon the previous example we can implement some logic to read and dump the object table:

    ATTR_START = 0x30
    
    def img
      @img ||= File.open(File.expand_path(DISK), 'rb')
    end
    
    def pages
      @pages ||= begin
        _pages = {}
        page_id = FIRST_PAGE
        img.seek(ADDRESS + page_id*PAGE_SIZE)
    
        while contents = img.read(PAGE_SIZE)
          id = contents.unpack('S').first
          if id == page_id
            pos = img.pos
            start = ADDRESS + page_id * PAGE_SIZE
            img.seek(start + PAGE_SEQ)
            seq = img.read(4).unpack("L").first
    
            img.seek(start + PAGE_VIRTUAL_PAGE_NUM)
            vpn = img.read(4).unpack("L").first
            _pages[id] = {:id => id, :seq => seq, :vpn => vpn}
            img.seek pos
          end
    
          page_id += 1
        end
    
        _pages
      end
    end
    
    def page(opts)
      if opts.key?(:id)
        return pages[opts[:id]]
      elsif opts[:vpn]
        return pages.values.select { |v|
          v[:vpn] == opts[:vpn]
        }.sort { |v1, v2| v1[:seq] <=> v2[:seq] }.last
      end
    
      nil
    end
    
  
    def obj_pages
      @obj_pages ||= begin
        obj_table = page(:vpn => 2)
  
        img.seek(ADDRESS + obj_table[:id] * PAGE_SIZE)
        bytes = img.read(PAGE_SIZE).unpack("C*")
        len1 = bytes[ATTR_START]
        len2 = bytes[ATTR_START+len1]
        start = ATTR_START + len1 + len2
  
        objs = {}
  
        while bytes.size > start && bytes[start] != 0
          len = bytes[start]
          id  = bytes[start+0x10..start+0x20-1].collect { |i| i.to_s(16).upcase }.reverse.join()
          tgt = bytes[start+0x20..start+0x21].collect   { |i| i.to_s(16).upcase }.reverse.join()
          objs[id] = tgt
          start += len
        end
  
        objs
      end
    end
  
    obj_pages.each { |id, tgt|
      puts "Object #{id} is on page #{tgt}"
    }

We could also implement a method to lookup a specific object's page:

    def obj_page(obj_id)
      obj_pages[obj_id]
    end

    puts page(:id => obj_page("0000006000000000").to_i(16))

This will retrieve the page containing the root directory


- Directories, from the root dir down, follow a consistent pattern. They are comprised of sequential lists of data structures whose length is given by the first word value (Attributes and Attribute Lists).

List are often prefixed with a Header Attribute defining the total length of the Attributes that follow that consititute the list. Though this is not a hard set rule as in the case where the list resides in the body of another Attribute (more on that below).

In either case, Attributes may be parsed by iterating over the bytes after the directory page header, reading and processing the first word to determine the next number of bytes to read (minus the length of the first word), and then repeating until null (0000) is encountered (being sure to process specified padding in the process)

- Various Attributes take on different semantics including references to subdirs and files as well as branches to additional pages containing more directory contents (for large directories); though not all Attributes have been identified.

The structures in a directory listing always seem to be of one of the following formats:

- Base Attribute - The simplest / base attribute consisting of a block whose length is given at the very start.

An example of a typical Attribute follows:

      a8 00 00 00  28 00 01 00  00 00 00 00  10 01 00 00  
      10 01 00 00  02 00 00 00  00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00  
      00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00  a9 d3 a4 c3  27 dd d2 01  
      5f a0 58 f3  27 dd d2 01  5f a0 58 f3  27 dd d2 01  
      a9 d3 a4 c3  27 dd d2 01  20 00 00 00  00 00 00 00  
      00 06 00 00  00 00 00 00  03 00 00 00  00 00 00 00  
      5c 9a 07 ac  01 00 00 00  19 00 00 00  00 00 00 00  
      00 00 01 00  00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00  
      00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00  
      00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00  01 00 00 00  00 00 00 00  
      00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00

Here we a section of 0xA8 length containing the following four file timestamps (more on this coversion below)

       a9 d3 a4 c3  27 dd d2 01 - 2017-06-04 07:43:20
       5f a0 58 f3  27 dd d2 01 - 2017-06-04 07:44:40
       5f a0 58 f3  27 dd d2 01 - 2017-06-04 07:44:40
       a9 d3 a4 c3  27 dd d2 01 - 2017-06-04 07:43:20

It is safe to assume that either

The following is a method which can be used to parse a given Attribute off disk, provided the img read position is set to its start:

    def read_attr
      pos = img.pos
      packed = img.read(4)
      return new if packed.nil?
      attr_len = packed.unpack('L').first
      return new if attr_len == 0

      img.seek pos
      value = img.read(attr_len)
      Attribute.new(:pos   => pos,
                    :bytes => value.unpack("C*"),
                    :len   => attr_len)
    end

- Records - Key / Value pairs whose total length and key / value lengths are given in the first 0x20 bytes of the attribute. These are used to associated metadata sections with files whose names are recorded in the keys and contents are recorded in the value.

An example of a typical Record follows:

    40 04 00 00   10 00 1A 00   08 00 30 00   10 04 00 00   @.........0.....
    30 00 01 00   6D 00 6F 00   66 00 69 00   6C 00 65 00   0...m.o.f.i.l.e.
    31 00 2E 00   74 00 78 00   74 00 00 00   00 00 00 00   1...t.x.t.......
    A8 00 00 00   28 00 01 00   00 00 00 00   10 01 00 00   ¨...(...........
    10 01 00 00   02 00 00 00   00 00 00 00   00 00 00 00   ................
    00 00 00 00   00 00 00 00   A9 D3 A4 C3   27 DD D2 01   ........©Ó¤Ã'ÝÒ.
    5F A0 58 F3   27 DD D2 01   5F A0 58 F3   27 DD D2 01   _ Xó'ÝÒ._ Xó'ÝÒ.
    A9 D3 A4 C3   27 DD D2 01   20 00 00 00   00 00 00 00   ©Ó¤Ã'ÝÒ. .......
    00 06 00 00   00 00 00 00   03 00 00 00   00 00 00 00   ................
    5C 9A 07 AC   01 00 00 00   19 00 00 00   00 00 00 00   \..¬............
    00 00 01 00   00 00 00 00   00 00 00 00   00 00 00 00   ................
    00 00 00 00   00 00 00 00   00 00 00 00   00 00 00 00   ................
    00 00 00 00   00 00 00 00   01 00 00 00   00 00 00 00   ................
    00 00 00 00   00 00 00 00   20 00 00 00   A0 01 00 00   ........ ... ...
    D4 00 00 00   00 02 00 00   74 02 00 00   01 00 00 00   Ô.......t.......
    78 02 00 00   00 00 00 00 ...(cutoff)                   x.......

Here we see the Record parameters given by the first row:

Naturally, the Record finishes after the value, 0x410 bytes after the value start at 0x30, or 0x440 bytes after the start of the Record (which lines up with the total length).

We also see that this Record corresponds to a file I created on disk as the key is the Record flag (0x10030) followed by the filename (mofile1.txt).

Here the first attribute in the Record value is the simple attribute we discussed above, containing the file timestamps. The File Reference Attribute List Header follows (more on that below).

From observation Records w/ flag values of '0' or '8' are what we are looking for, while '4' occurs often, this almost always seems to indicate a Historical Record, or a Record that has since been replaced with another.

Since Records are prefixed with their total length, they can be thought of a subclass of Attribute. The following is a Ruby class that uses composition to dispatch record field lookup calls to values in the underlying Attribute:

    class Record
      attr_accessor :attribute

      def initialize(attribute)
        @attribute = attribute
      end

      def key_offset
        @key_offset ||= attribute.words[2]
      end

      def key_length
        @key_length ||= attribute.words[3]
      end

      def flags
        @flags ||= attribute.words[4]
      end

      def value_offset
        @value_offset ||= attribute.words[5]
      end

      def value_length
        @value_offset ||= attribute.words[6]
      end

      def key
        @key ||= begin
          ko, kl, vo, vl = boundries
          attribute.bytes[ko...ko+kl].pack('C*')
        end
      end

      def value
        @value ||= begin
          ko, kl, vo, vl = boundries
          attribute.bytes[vo..-1].pack('C*')
        end
      end

      def value_pos
        attribute.pos + value_offset
      end

      def key_pos
        attribute.pos + key_offset
      end
    end # class Record

- AttributeList - These are more complicated but interesting. At first glance they are simple Attributes of length 0x20 but upon further inspection we consistently see it contains the length of a large block of Attributes (this length is inclusive, as it contains this first one). After parsing this Attribute, dubbed the 'List Header', we should read the remaining bytes in the List as well as the padding, before arriving at the next Attribute

   20 00 00 00   A0 01 00 00   D4 00 00 00   00 02 00 00 <- list header specifying total length (0x1A0) and padding (0xD4)
   74 02 00 00   01 00 00 00   78 02 00 00   00 00 00 00
   80 01 00 00   10 00 0E 00   08 00 20 00   60 01 00 00
   60 01 00 00   00 00 00 00   80 00 00 00   00 00 00 00
   88 00 00 00  ... (cutoff)

Here we see an Attribute of 0x20 length, that contains a reference to a larger block size (0x1A0) in its third word.

This can be confirmed by the next Attribute whose size (0x180) is the larger block size minute the length of the header (0x1A0 - 0x20). In this case the list only contains one item/child attribute.

In general a simple strategy to parse the entire case would be to:

It also seems that:

Here is a class that represents an AttributeList header attribute by encapsulating it in a similar manner to Record above:

    class AttributeListHeader
      attr_accessor :attribute

      def initialize(attr)
        @attribute = attr
      end

      # From my observations this is always 0x20
      def len
        @len ||= attribute.dwords[0]
      end

      def total_len
        @total_len ||= attribute.dwords[1]
      end

      def body_len
        @body_len ||= total_len - len
      end

      def padding
        @padding ||= attribute.dwords[2]
      end

      def type
        @type ||= attribute.dwords[3]
      end

      def end_pos
        @end_pos ||= attribute.dwords[4]
      end

      def flags
        @flags ||= attribute.dwords[5]
      end

      def next_pos
        @next_pos ||= attribute.dwords[6]
      end
    end

Here is a method to parse the actual Attribute List assuming the image read position is set to the beginning of the List Header

    def read_attribute_list
      header        = Header.new(read_attr)
      remaining_len = header.body_len
      orig_pos      = img.pos
      bytes         = img.read remaining_len
      img.seek orig_pos

      attributes = []

      until remaining_len == 0
        attributes    << read_attr
        remaining_len -= attributes.last.len
      end

      img.seek orig_pos - header.len + header.end_pos

      AttributeList.new :header     => header,
                        :pos        => orig_pos,
                        :bytes      => bytes,
                        :attributes => attributes
    end

Now we have most of what is needed to locate and parse individual files, but there are a few missing components including:

- Directory Tree Branches: These are Attribute Lists where each Attribute corresponds to a record whose value references a page which contains more directory contents.

Upon encountering an AttributeList header with flag value 0x301, we should

Additional files and subdirs found on the referenced pages should be appended to the list of current directory contents.

Note this is the (an?) implementation of the BTree structure in the ReFS filesystem described by Microsoft, as the record keys contain the tree leaf identifiers (based on file and subdirectory names).

This can be used for quick / efficient file and subdir lookup by name (see 'optimization' in 'next steps' below)

- SubDirectories: these are simply Records in the directory's Attribute List whose key contains the 0x20030 flag as well as the subdir name.

The value of this Record is the corresponding object id which can be used to lookup the page containing the subdir in the object table.

A typical subdirectory Record

    70 00 00 00  10 00 12 00  00 00 28 00  48 00 00 00  
    30 00 02 00  73 00 75 00  62 00 64 00  69 00 72 00  <- here we see the key containing the flag (30 00 02 00) followed by the dir name ("subdir2")
    32 00 00 00  00 00 00 00  03 07 00 00  00 00 00 00  <- here we see the object id as the first qword in the value (0x730)
    00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00  14 69 60 05  28 dd d2 01  <- here we see the directory timestamps (more on those below)
    cc 87 ce 52  28 dd d2 01  cc 87 ce 52  28 dd d2 01  
    cc 87 ce 52  28 dd d2 01  00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00  
    00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00  00 00 00 10  00 00 00 00

- Files: like directories are Records whose key contains a flag (0x10030) followed by the filename.

The value is far more complicated though and while we've discovered some basic Attributes allowing us to pull timestamps and content from the fs, there is still more to be deduced as far as the semantics of this Record's value.

- The File Record value consists of multiple attributes, though they just appear one after each other, without a List Header. We can still parse them sequentially given that all Attributes are individually prefixed with their lengths and the File Record value length gives us the total size of the block.

- The first attribute contains 4 file timestamps at an offset given by the fifth byte of the attribute (though this position may be coincidental an the timestamps could just reside at a fixed location in this attribute).

In the first attribute example above we see the first timestamp is

       a9 d3 a4 c3  27 dd d2 01

This corresponds to the following date

        2017-06-04 07:43:20

And may be converted with the following algorithm:

          tsi = TIMESTAMP_BYTES.pack("C*").unpack("Q*").first
          Time.at(tsi / 10000000 - 11644473600)

Timestamps being in nanoseconds since the Windows Epoch Data (11644473600 = Jan 1, 1601 UTC)

- The second Attribute seems to be the Header of an Attribute List containing the 'File Reference' semantics. These are the Attributes that encapsulate the file length and content pointers.

I'm assuming this is an Attribute List so as to contain many of these types of Attributes for large files. What is not apparent are the full semantics of all of these fields.

But here is where it gets complicated, this List only contains a single attribute with a few child Attributes. This encapsulation seems to be in the same manner as the Attributes stored in the File Record value above, just a simple sequential collection without a Header.

In this single attribute (dubbed the 'File Reference Body') the first Attribute contains the length of the file while the second is the Header for yet another List, this one containing a Record whose value contains a reference to the page which the file contents actually reside.

      ----------------------------------------
      | ...                                  |
      ----------------------------------------
      | File Entry Record                    |
      | Key: 0x10030 [FileName]              |
      | Value:                               |
      | Attribute1: Timestamps               |
      | Attribute2:                          |
      |   File Reference List Header         |
      |   File Reference List Body(Record)   |
      |     Record Key: ?                    |
      |     Record Value:                    |
      |       File Length Attribute          |
      |       File Content List Header       |
      |       File Content Record(s)         |
      | Padding                              |
      ----------------------------------------
      | ...                                  |
      ----------------------------------------

While complicated each level can be parsed in a similar manner to all other Attributes & Records, just taking care to parse Attributes into their correct levels & structures.

As far as actual values,

---

And that's it! An example implementation of all this logic can be seen in our expiremental 'resilience' library found here:

https://github.com/movitto/resilience

The next steps would be to

And once we have done so robustly, we can start looking at optimization, possibly rolling out some expiremental production logic for ReFS filesystem support!

... Cha-ching $ £ ¥ ¢ ₣ ₩ !!!!

Jun 24 2017 retro gaming raspberry pi

RetroFlix / PI Switch Followup

I've been trying to dedicate some cycles to wrapping up the Raspberry PI entertainment center project mentioned a while back. I decided to abandon the PI Switch idea as the original controller which was purchased for it just did not work properly (or should I say only worked sporadically/intermitantly). It being a cheap device bought online, it wasn't worth the effort to debug (funny enough I can't find the device on Amazon anymore, perhaps other people were having issues...).

Not being able to find another suitable gamepad to use as the basis for a snap together portable device, I bought a Rii wireless controller (which works great out of the box!) and dropped the project (also partly due to lack of personal interest). But the previously designed wall mount works great, and after a bit of work the PI now functions as a seamless media center.

Unfortunately to get it there, a few workarounds were needed. These are listed below (in no particular order).


Finally RetroFlix received some tweaking & love. Most changes were visual optimizations and eye candy (including some nice retro fonts and colors), though a workers were also added so the actual downloads could be performed without blocking the UI. Overall it's simple and works great, a perfect portal to work on those high scores!

That's all for now, look for some more updates on the ReFS front in the near future!

May 14 2017 retro gaming raspberry pi sinatra

RetroFlix - A Weekend Project

Now that we have the 'mount' component of the PI Sw1tch, and an awesome way to playgames through the PI on our TV, we need a collection of games to play! It goes without saying that Nethack was installed (combined w/ ssh X11 forwarding = persistent graphical nethack anywhere = epicness!!!). But I also happen to have a huge box of Retro video games (dating back to my childhood), which would be good to load onto the device. But unfortunately cloning so many games would take some time, and there are already online databases of these backups, so I opted to write a small web app to download and manage the collection.

It can be found here and you can see some screens below:

My library Game info Game previews Game list

It was built as a Sinatra web service, simply acting as a frontend to a popular emulator database, allowing the user to navigate & preview app for various systems, and download / run them locally. The RetroFlix application itself is offered as a lightweight Microservice simply acting as a proxy to the required various underlying components. It's fairly simple to setup & install (see the README), and builds upon existing emulators & components the user has locally.

As with everything else, it's still a work in progress, but it already sufficing to relive classic memories!

May 10 2017 3d printing raspberry pi

3D Printing Fun

The PI Sw1tch project took a bit of a setback recently when we discovered the 5200mAH usb battery we had wasn't sufficient to drive the PI + display for any extensive period of time. I've ordered a higher-capacity battery from Amazon, but until it arrives the working prototype was redesigned into a snappable wall mount:

Wall pi2 Wall pi1

The current implementation can be found on thingiverse for all your 3D printing needs!

Additionally, we threw together a design for a wall mount for my last smartphone, the Samsung Intercept, which has been sitting on my shelf since I upgraded to the Huawei Union. The Intercept was a great phone, and it still works well, albiet a bit slow compared to modern devices (not to mention it only runs Android 2.2). But it more than suffices for a "smart" entertainment hub, and having mounted & wired up to my stereo system, I now have easy access to all the albums in the world (...that are available via youtube...). The device supposidly can be rooted, though I was not able to accomplish that myself and don't really care to spend more time figuring that out (really wouldn't gain much). But just goes to show how a little inguinity + some design work can go along way at reducing e-waste.

Wall intercept2 Wall intercept1

Now time to figure out what to do w/ my ancient Droid (the original A855!)

Keep on hacking!

Apr 29 2017

A New Site, A Fresh Start

I started this blog 10 years ago. How the world has changed... (and yet is still the same...)

Recently I noticed my site was unaccessible. No 404, no error response, just a blank page. After a brief moment of panic, I ssh'd into my host provider and breathed a sign of relief upon discovering all db & fs entities intact, including the instance of Drupal which my site was based on (a horribly outdated instance mind you, and note I said was based). In any case, I suspect my (cheap) host provider updated their version of PHP or some critical library w/ the effect of my Drupal instance not working.

Dogefox

Having struggled w/ PHP & Drupal many times over the years, I was finally ready to go cold turkey, and migrated the blog to Middleman, which brings the awesomeness of Rails to static site generation. I am very much in love with Middleman right now, it's the perfect tool for this problem domain, it's incredibly easy to setup a new site, use any high level templating / markup / styling language to customize your frontend, throw in any js or other framework to handle dynamic interactions (including emscripten to run C in the browser), and you're good to go. Tailoring things on the fly is a cinch due to the convenient embedded webserver sporting live-reloading, and when you're ready to push to production it's a single command to build the static html. A quick rsync -azP synchronizes it w/ your webserver and now your site is available to the world at blazing speeds!

Anyways, enough Middleman gushing (but seriously check it out!). In addition to the port, I rethemed the site, be sure to also check out the new design if your reading this via rss. Note mobile browser UI's aren't currently supported, so no angry emails if you can't read things on your phone! (I know their coming...)

Be sure to stay subscribed to github for updates. I'm hoping virtfs-refs will see some love soon if I can figure out how to extend the current fs parsing mechanisms w/ file content retrieval. We've also been prototyping designs for the PI Switch project I mentioned a while back, more updates on that soon as things progress.

Keep surfing!!!

Apr 9 2017 nethack gcc compiler fedora

Compiling / Playing NetHack 3.6.0 on Fedora

The following are the simplest instructions required to compile NetHack 3.6.0 for Fedora 25.

Why might you want to compile NetHack from source, instead of simply installing the package (sudo dnf install nethack)? For many reasons. Applying patches for custom game mechanics. Running an alternate frontend. And more!

While the official Linux instructions are complete, they are pretty involved and must be followed exactly for things to work. To give the dev team credit, they’ve been supporting a plethora of platforms and environments for 20+ years (and the number is still increasing). While a consolidated guide was written for compiling NetHack from scratch on Ubuntu/Debian but nothing exists for Fedora… until now!


# On a fresh Fedora installation (with updates) install the dependencies:

$ sudo dnf install ncurses-devel libXt-devel libXaw-devel byacc flex

# Download the NetHack (3.6.0) source tarball from the official site and unpack it:

$ tar xzvf [download]
$ cd nethack-3.6.0/

# Run the base setup utility for Linux:

$ cd sys/unix
$ ./setup.sh hints/linux
$ cd ../..

# Edit [include/unixconf.h] to uncomment the following line…

#define LINUX

# Edit [include/config.h] to uncomment the following line…

#define X11_GRAPHICS

# Edit [src/Makefile] and update the following lines…

WINSRC = $(WINTTYSRC)
WINOBJ = $(WINTTYOBJ)
WINLIB = $(WINTTYLIB)

# …to look like so

WINSRC = $(WINTTYSRC) $(WINX11SRC)
WINOBJ = $(WINTTYOBJ) $(WINX11OBJ)
WINLIB = $(WINTTYLIB) $(WINX11LIB)

# Edit [Makefile] to uncomment the following line

VARDATND = x11tiles NetHack.ad pet_mark.xbm pilemark.xpm rip.xpm

# In previous line, apply this bugfix by changing…

pilemark.xpm

# …to

pilemark.xbm

# Build and install the game

$ make all
$ make install

# Finally create [~/.nethackrc] config file and populate it with the following: OPTIONS=windowtype:x11


# To play:

$ ~/nh/install/games/nethack

Go get that Amulet!

Mar 4 2017 virtfs filesystems

VirtFS New Plugin Guide

Having recently extracted much of the FS interface from MiQ into virtfs plugins, it was a good time to write a guide on how to write a new plugin from scratch. It is attached below.


This document details the process of writing a new VirtFS plugin from scratch.

Plugins may be written for many targets, from traditional filesystems (EXT, FAT, XFS), to filesystem-like entities, such as databases and object repositories, to things completely unrelated all together. Once written, VirtFS will use the plugin to expose the underlying component via the Ruby Filesystem API. Simply issue File & Dir calls to files under the specified mountpoint, and VirtFS will take care of the remaining details.

This guide assumes basic familiarity with the Ruby language and gem project format, in this tutorial we will be creating a new gem called virtfs-hellofs for our ‘hello’ filesystem, based on a simple JSON map.

Note, the end result can be seen at virtfs-hellofs


Initial Project Layout

Create a new working directory with the following contents:

  virtfs-hellofs/
                 lib/
                     virtfs-hellofs.rb
                     virtfs/
                            hellofs.rb
                            hellofs/
                                    fs/
                                    version.rb
                 virtfs-hellofs.gemspec
                 Gemfile

TODO: a generator [patches are welcome!]


Required Components

The following components are required to define a full-fledged filesystem plugin:

Upon instantiation, a fs-specific ‘blocklike device’ is often required so as to provide block-level seek/read/write operations (such as from a physical disk, disk image, or other).

Eventually this will be implemented via a separate abstraction hierarchy, but for the time being virt-disk provides basic functionality to read simple file-based “devices”. Since we are only using a simply in-memory JSON based fs, we do not need to pull in virt_disk here.


Core functionality

First we will define the FS class providing our filesystem interface:

lib/virtfs/hellofs/fs.rb

  module VirtFS::HelloFS
    class FS
      include DirClassMethods
      include FileClassMethods

      attr_accessor :mount_point, :superblock

      # Return bool indicating if device contains
      # a HelloFS instance
      def self.match?(device)
        begin
          Superblock.new(self, device)
          return true
        rescue => err
          return false
        end
      end

      # Initialze new HelloFS instance w/ the
      # specified device
      def initialize(device)
        @superblock  = Superblock.new(self, device)
      end

      # Return root directory of the filesystem
      def root_dir
        superblock.root_dir
      end

      def thin_interface?
        true
      end

      def umount
        @mount_point = nil
      end
    end # class FS
  end # module VirtFS::HelloFS

Here we see a few things, particularly the inclusion of the Directory and File class methods satisfying the VirtFS API (more on those later) and the instantiation of a HelloFS specific Superblock construct.

In the #match? method, We verify the superblock of the underlying device matches that required by hellofs and we specify various core callbacks needed by VirtFS (particularly the #unmount and #thin_interface? methods, see this for more details on thin vs. thick interfaces).

The superblock class for HelloFS is simple, we implement our ‘filesystem’ through a simple json map, passed into virtfs on instantiation

lib/virtfs/hellofs/superblock.rb

module VirtFS::HelloFS
  # Top level filesystem construct.
  #
  # In our case, we simply create a new
  # root directory from the HelloFS
  # json hash, but in most cases this
  # would parse / read top level metadata
  class Superblock
    attr_accessor :device

    def initialize(fs, device)
      @fs     = fs
      @device = device
    end

    def root_dir
      Dir.new(self, device)
    end
  end # class SuperBlock
end # module VirtFS::Hello

VirtFS API

In the previous section the core fs class included two mixins, DirClassMethods and FileClassMethods implementing the VirtFS filesystem interface.

lib/virtfs/hellofs/fs/dir_class_methods.rb

module VirtFS::HelloFS
  class FS
    # VirtFS Dir API implementation, dispatches
    # calls to underlying HelloFS constructs
    module DirClassMethods
      def dir_delete(p)
      end

      def dir_entries(p)
        dir = get_dir(p)
        return nil if dir.nil?
        dir.glob_names
      end

      def dir_exist?(p)
        begin
          !get_dir(p).nil?
        rescue
          false
        end
      end

      def dir_foreach(p, &block)
        r = get_dir(p).try(:glob_names)
                      .try(:each, &block)
        block.nil? ? r : nil
      end

      def dir_mkdir(p, permissions)
      end

      def dir_new(fs_rel_path, hash_args, _open_path, _cwd)
        get_dir(fs_rel_path)
      end

      private

      def get_dir(p)
        names = p.split(/[\\\/]/)
        names.shift

        dir = get_dir_r(names)
        raise "Directory '#{p}' not found" if dir.nil?
        dir
      end

      def get_dir_r(names)
        return root_dir if names.empty?

        # Check for this path in the cache.
        fname = names.join('/')

        name = names.pop
        pdir = get_dir_r(names)
        return nil if pdir.nil?

        de = pdir.find_entry(name)
        return nil if de.nil?

        Directory.new(self, superblock, de.inode)
      end
    end # module DirClassMethods
  end # class FS
end # module VirtFS::HelloFS

This module implements the standard Ruby Dir Class operations including retrieving & modifying directory contents, and checking for file existence.

Particularly noteworthy is the get_dir method which returns the FS specific dir instance.

lib/virtfs/hellofs/fs/file_class_methods.rb

module VirtFS::HelloFS
  class FS
    # VirtFS file class implemention, dispatches requests
    # to underlying HelloFS constructs
    module FileClassMethods
      def file_atime(p)
      end

      def file_blockdev?(p)
      end

      def file_chardev?(p)
      end

      def file_chmod(permission, p)
        raise "writes not supported"
      end

      def file_chown(owner, group, p)
        raise "writes not supported"
      end

      def file_ctime(p)
      end

      def file_delete(p)
      end

      def file_directory?(p)
        f = get_file(p)
        !f.nil? && f.dir?
      end

      def file_executable?(p)
      end

      def file_executable_real?(p)
      end

      def file_exist?(p)
        !get_file(p).nil?
      end

      def file_file?(p)
        f = get_file(p)
        !f.nil? && f.file?
      end

      def file_ftype(p)
      end

      def file_grpowned?(p)
      end

      def file_identical?(p1, p2)
      end

      def file_lchmod(permission, p)
      end

      def file_lchown(owner, group, p)
      end

      def file_link(p1, p2)
      end

      def file_lstat(p)
      end

      def file_mtime(p)
      end

      def file_owned?(p)
      end

      def file_pipe?(p)
      end

      def file_readable?(p)
      end

      def file_readable_real?(p)
      end

      def file_readlink(p)
      end

      def file_rename(p1, p2)
      end

      def file_setgid?(p)
      end

      def file_setuid?(p)
      end

      def file_size(p)
      end

      def file_socket?(p)
      end

      def file_stat(p)
      end

      def file_sticky?(p)
      end

      def file_symlink(oname, p)
      end

      def file_symlink?(p)
        get_file(p).try(:symlink?)
      end

      def file_truncate(p, len)
      end

      def file_utime(atime, mtime, p)
      end

      def file_world_readable?(p)
      end

      def file_world_writable?(p)
      end

      def file_writable?(p)
      end

      def file_writable_real?(p)
      end

      def file_new(f, parsed_args, _open_path, _cwd)
        file = get_file(f)
        raise Errno::ENOENT, "No such file or directory" if file.nil?
        File.new(file, superblock)
      end

      private

        def get_file(p)
          dir, fname = VfsRealFile.split(p)

          begin
            dir_obj = get_dir(dir)
            dir_entry = dir_obj.nil? ? nil : dir_obj.find_entry(fname)
          rescue RuntimeError
            nil
          end
        end
    end # module FileClassMethods
  end # class FS
end # module VirtFS::HelloFS

The FileClassMethods module provides all the FS-specific funcality needed by Ruby to dispatch File Class calls (which contains a larger footprint than Dir, hence the need for more methods here).

Here we see many methods are not yet implemented. This is OK for the purposes of use in VirtFS but note any calls to the corresponding methods on a mounted filesystem will fail.


File and Dir classes

The final missing piece of the puzzle is the File and Dir classes. These provide standard interfaces which VirtFS can extract file and dir information.

lib/virtfs/hello/file.rb

module VirtFS::HelloFS
  # File class representation, responsible for
  # managing corresponding dir_entry attributes
  # and file content.
  #
  # For HelloFS, files are simple in memory strings
  class File
    attr_accessor :superblock, :dir_entry

    def initialize(superblock, dir_entry)
      @sb        = superblock
      @dir_entry = dir_entry
    end

    def to_h
      { :directory? => dir?,
        :file?      => file?,
        :symlink?   => false }
    end

    def dir?
      dir_entry.is_a?(Hash)
    end

    def file?
      dir_entry.is_a?(String)
    end

    def fs
      @sb.fs
    end

    def size
      dir? ? 0 : dir_entry.size
    end

    def close
    end
  end # class File
end # module VirtFS::HelloFS

lib/virtfs/hello/dir.rb

module VirtFS::HelloFS
  # Dir class representation, responsible
  # for managing corresponding dir_entry
  # attributes
  #
  # For HelloFS, dirs are simply nested
  # json maps
  class Dir
    attr_accessor :sb, :dir_entry

    def initialize(sb, dir_entry)
      @sb        = sb
      @dir_entry = dir_entry
    end

    def close
    end

    def glob_names
      dir_entry.keys
    end

    def find_entry(name, type = nil)
      dir = type == :dir
      fle = type == :file

      return nil unless glob_names.include?(name)
      return nil if (dir && !dir_entry[name].is_a?(Hash)) ||
                    (fle && !dir_entry[name].is_a?(String))
      dir ? Dir.new(sb, dir_entry[name]) :
            File.new(sb, dir_entry[name])
    end
  end # class Directory
end # module VirtFS::HelloFS

Again these are fairly straightforward, providing access to the underlying JSON map in a filesystem-like manner.


Polish

To finish, we’ll populate the project components required by every rubygem:

lib/virtfs-hellofs.rb

require "virtfs/hellofs.rb"

lib/virtfs/hellofs.rb

require "virtfs/hellofs/version"
require_relative 'hellofs/fs.rb'
require_relative 'hellofs/dir'
require_relative 'hellofs/file'
require_relative 'hellofs/superblock'

lib/virtfs/hellofs/version.rb

module VirtFS
  module HelloFS
    VERSION = "0.1.0"
  end
end

virtfs-hellofs.gemspec:

lib = File.expand_path('../lib', __FILE__)
$LOAD_PATH.unshift(lib) unless $LOAD_PATH.include?(lib)
require 'virtfs/hellofs/version'

Gem::Specification.new do |spec|
  spec.name          = "virtfs-hellofs"
  spec.version       = VirtFS::HelloFS::VERSION
  spec.authors       = ["Cool Developers"]

  spec.summary       = %q{An HELLO based filesystem module for VirtFS}
  spec.description   = %q{An HELLO based filesystem module for VirtFS}
  spec.homepage      = "https://github.com/ManageIQ/virtfs-hellofs"
  spec.license       = "Apache 2.0"

  spec.files         = `git ls-files -z`.split("\x0").reject { |f| f.match(%r{^(test|spec|features)/}) }
  spec.bindir        = "exe"
  spec.executables   = spec.files.grep(%r{^exe/}) { |f| File.basename(f) }
  spec.require_paths = ["lib"]

  spec.add_dependency "activesupport"
  spec.add_development_dependency "bundler"
  spec.add_development_dependency "rake", "~> 10.0"
  spec.add_development_dependency "rspec", "~> 3.0"
  spec.add_development_dependency "factory_girl"
end

Gemfile:

source 'https://rubygems.org'

gem 'virtfs', "~> 0.0.1",
    :git => "https://github.com/ManageIQ/virtfs.git",
    :branch => "master"

# Specify your gem's dependencies in virtfs-hellofs.gemspec
gemspec

group :test do
  gem 'virt_disk', "~> 0.0.1",
      :git => "https://github.com/ManageIQ/virt_disk.git",
      :branch => "initial"
end

Rakefile:

require "bundler/gem_tasks"
require "rspec/core/rake_task"

RSpec::Core::RakeTask.new(:spec)

task :default => :spec

Packaging It Up

Building virtfs-hellofs.gem is as simple as running:

rake build

in the project directory.

The gem will be written to the ‘pkg’ subdir and is ready for subsequent use / upload to rubygems.


Verification

To verify the plugin, create a test module which simply mounts a FS instance and dumps the directory contents:

test.rb

require 'json'
require 'virtfs'
require 'virtfs/hellofs'

PATH = JSON.parse(File.read('hello.fs'))

exit 1 unless VirtFS::HelloFS::FS.match?(PATH)
fs = VirtFS::HelloFS::FS.new(PATH)

VirtFS.mount fs, '/'
puts VirtFS::VDir.entries('/')

We can create a simple JSON filesystem for testing purposes:

hello.fs

{
  "f1" : "foobar",
  "f2" : "barfoo",
  "d1" : { "sf1" : "fignewton",
           "sd1" : { "t" : "s" } }
}

Run the script, and if the directory contents are printed, you verified your FS!


Testing

rspec and factory_girl were added as development dependencies to the project and testing the new filesystem is as simple as adding new unit tests.

For ‘real’ filesystems, the plugin author will need to generate a ‘blocklike device’ image and populate it w/ the necessary test data.

Because large block image files are not condusive to source repository systems and automated build systems, virtfs-camcorderfs can be used to record and playback disk interactions in local dev environment, recording text based ‘cassettes’ which may be used to replicate disk interactions. See virtfs-camcorderfs for usage details.


Next Steps

We added barebones basic VirtFS functionality for our hellofs filesystem backend. From here, we can continue expanding upon this, providing read, write, and query support. Once implemented, VirtFS will use this filesystem like every other, providing seamless interchangeabilty!

Feb 18 2017 project raspberry pi gaming

Project Idea - PI Sw1tch

While gaming is not high on my agenda anymore (... or rather at all), I have recently been mulling buying a new console, to act as much as a home entertainment center as a gaming system.

Having owned several generations PlayStation and Sega products, a few new consoles caught my eye. While the most "open" solution, the Steambox sort-of fizzled out, Nintendo's latest console Switch does seem to stand out of the crowd. The balance between power and portability looks like a good fit, and given Nintendo's previous successes, it wouldn't be surprising if it became a hit.

In addition to the separate home and mobile gaming markets, new entertainment mechanisms are needing to provide seamless integration between the two environments, as well as offer comprehensive data and information access capabilities. After all what'd be the point of a gaming tablet if you couldn't watch Youtube on it! Neal Stephenson recently touched on this at his latest TechCrunch talk, by expressing a vision of technology that is more integrated/synergized with our immediate environment. While mobile solutions these days offer a lot in terms of processing power, nothing quite offers the comfort or immersion that a console / home entertainment solution provides (not to mention mobile phones being horrendous interfaces for gaming purposes!)

Being the geek that I am, this naturally led me to thinking about developing a hybrid mechanism of my own, based on open / existing solutions, so that it could be prototyped and demonstrated quickly. Having recently bought a Raspeberry PI (after putting my Arduino to use in my last microcontroller project), and a few other odds and end pieces, I whipped up the following:

Pi sw1tch

The idea is simple, the Raspberry PI would act as the 'console', with a plethora of games and 'apps' available (via open repositories, steam, emulators, and many more... not to mention Nethack!). It would be anchorable to the wall, desk, or any other surface by using a 3D-printed mount, and made portable via a cheap wireless controller / LCD display / battery pack setup (tied together through another custom 3D printed bracket). The entire rig would be quickly assemblable and easy to use, simply snap the PI into the wall to play on your TV; remove and snap into the controller bracket to take it on the go.

I suspect the power component is going to be the most difficult to nail down, finding an affordable USB power source that is lightweight but offers sufficient juice to drive the Raspberry PI w/ LCD might be tricky. But if this is done correctly, all components will be interchangeable, and one can easily plug in a lower-power microcontroller and/or custom hardware component for a tailored experience.

If there is any interest, let me know via email. If 3 or so people commit, this could be done in a weekend! (stay tuned for updates!)

Jan 26 2017 vim grep sed

Search and Replace The VIM Way

Did you know that it is 2017 and the VIM editor still does not have a decent multi-file search and replacement mechanism?! While you can always roll your own, it’s rather cumbersome, and even though some would say this isn’t in the spirit of an editor such as VIM, a large community has emerged around extending it in ways to behave more like a traditional IDE.

Having written about doing something similar to this via the cmd line a while back, and having refactored a large amount of code recently that involved lots of renaming, I figured it was time to write a plugin to do just that, rename strings across source files, using grep and sed


Before we begin, it should be noted that this is of most use with a ‘rooting’ plugin like vim-rooter. By using this, you will ensure vim is always running in the root directory of the project you are working on, regardless of the file being modified. Thus all search & replace commands will be run relative to the top project dir.

To install vsearch, we use Vundle. Setup & installation of that is out of scope for this article, but I highly recommend familiarizing yourself with Vundle as it’s the best Vim plugin management system (in my opinion).

Once Vundle is installed, using vsearch is as simple as adding the following to your ~/.vim/vimrc:

Plugin ‘movitto/vim-vsearch’

Restart Vim and run :PluginInstall to install vsearch from github. Now you’re good to go!


vsearch provides two commands :VSearch and :VReplace.

VSearch simply runs grep and displays the results, without interrupting the buffer you are currently editing.

VReplace runs a search in a similar manner to VSearch but also performs and in-memory string replacement using the specified args. This is displayed to the user who is prompted for comfirmation. Upon receiving it, the plugin then executes sed and reports the results.

Nov 7 2016 aikido philosophy splix gaming

Lessons on Aikido and Life via Splix

Recently, I've stumbled upon splix, a new obsession game, with simple mechanics that unfold into a complex competitive challenge requiring fast reflexes and dynamic tactics.

Splix intro

At the core the rule set is very simple: - surround territory to claim it - do not allow other players to hit your tail (you lose... game over)

Splix overextended

While in your territory you have no tail, rendering you invulnerable, but during battles territory is always changing, and you don't want to get caught deep on an attack just to be surrounded by an enemy who swaps the territory alignment to his!

Splix deception

The simple dynamic yields an unbelievable amount of strategy & tactics to excel at while at the same time requiring quick calculation and planning. A foolheardy player will just rush into enemy territory to attempt to capture squares and attack his opponent but a smart player will bait his opponent into his sphere of influence through tactful strikes and misdirections.

Splix bait

Furthermore we see age old adages such as "better to run and fight another day" and the wisdom of pitting opponents against each other. Alliances are always shifting in splix, it simply takes a single tap from any other player to end your game. So while you may be momentarily coordinating with another player to surround and obliterate a third, watch your back as the alliance may dissove at the first opportunity (not to mention the possiblity of outside players appearing anytime!)

Splix alliance

All in all, I've found careful observation and quick action to yield the most successful results on the battlefield. The ideal kill is from behind an opponent who has periously invaded your territory deeply. Beyond this, lurking at the border so as the goad the enemy into a foolheardy / reckless attack is a robust tactic provided you have built up the relfexes and coordination to quickly move in and out of territory which is constantly changing. Make sure you don't fall suspect to your own trick and overpenetrate the enemy border!

Splix bait2

Another tactic to deal w/ an overly aggressive opponent is to slightly fallback into your safe zone to quickly return to the front afterwords, perhaps at a different angle or via a different route. Often a novice opponent will see the retreat as a sign of fear or weakness and become over confident, penetrating deep into your territory in the hopes of securing a large portion quickly. By returning to the front at an unexpected moment, you will catch the opponents off guard and be able to destroy them before they have a chance to retreat to their safe zone.

Splix draw out

Of course if the opponent employs the same strategy, a player can take a calculated risk and drive a distance into the enemy territory before returning to the safe zone. By paying attention to the percentage of visible territory which the player's vulnerability zone occupies and the relative position of the opponent, they should be able to safely guage the safe distance to which they can extend so as to ensure a safe return. Taking large amounts of territory quickly is psychologically damaging to an opponent, especially one undergoing attacks on multiple fronts.

Splix draw out2

If all else fails to overcome a strong opponent, a reasonable retreat followed by an alternate attack vector may result in success. Since in splix we know that an safe zone corresponds to only one enemy, if we can guage / guess where they are, we can attempt to alter the dynamics of the battle accordingly. If we see that an opponent has stretch far beyond the mass of his safe zone via a single / thin channel, we can attempt to cut them off, preventing a retreat without crossing your sphere of influence.

Splix changing

This dynamic becomes even more pronounced if we can encircle an opponent, and start slowly reducing his control of the board. By slowly but mechanically & gradually taking enemy territory we can drive an opponent in a desired direction, perhaps towards a wall or other player.

Splix tactics2

Regardless of the situation, the true strategist will always be shuffling his tactics and actions to adapt to the board and setup the conditions for guaranteed victory. At no point should another player be underestimated or trusted. Even a new player with little territory can pose a threat to the top of the leader board given the right conditions and timing. The victorious will stay clam in the heat of the the battle, and use careful observations, timing, and quick reflexes to win the game.

(<endnote> the game *requires* a keyboard, it can be played via smartphone (swapping) but the arrow keys yields the fastest feedback</endnode>)